In a remarkable new blow against sexual equality, Kit Harington has been forced to apologise for implying that men can be sexually harassed too.

You shouldn’t expect an industry to sort out its various forms of exploitation until it learns to admit it has a problem. Or at least agrees that everybody lying with a prophylactic smile is on the road to salvation.

Game of Thrones actor Kit Harrington is apologising for something he said a year ago that nobody gave a shit about before the witch hunts began in earnest. Harrington was talking about how often he’s asked to remove his shirt for casting and the burden of hunky model looking men in entertainment.

Also, forever stories in gossip columns about what it might be like to fuck him. That’s not the official title of the stories, but the basic premise that is contained therein. Male stars almost never complain about this, because who wants to sound like a total pussy?

Kit Harington perhaps.

Harrington categorised the women and gay men in the room rubbing one out to his hot abs as “sexism”, a commentary he now regrets in light of the edicts from the post-Weinstein politburo.

Harrington immediately moved to the progressive British paper The Guardian for an explanation and a splash of kowtowing:

“Sexism against men is not something I should have really said. I think what I meant was, being objectified. At that time, I did feel objectified, and now I’ve learned how to control that.”

“Do I think my position is the same as a woman’s in society? No. They’re very different things, and I should have separated them. I was wrong.”

That sets things straight. Women are equal to men, except when it comes to certain sweeping protections. Primus inter pares. That’s historically worked so well as a fundamental governing policy.

People in Hollywood have seen what became of Ben Affleck and they are scouring their closets for anything that might be re-posted on Twitter with slam from feminists.

How far do you have to go back? Robert E. Lee and Woodrow Wilson are feeling the pain. Figure at least a century or two of historical revision has you covered.